Chinese Medicine: Native Wisdom for Modern Times

chinese pagodaDo you know anyone with long-term or deep injuries which have not healed properly? Standard Western medical practices sometimes fail to identify, explain, or treat the core underlying cause of many diseases and ailments. As general demand and interest in alternative healing therapies increases, Chinese medicine offers a viable option worth exploring for many patients.

To clarify, Chinese medicine is a broad umbrella term which captures any healing practice which holds out the belief that the body’s vital energy, termed qi (pronounced chi), circulates through channels, called meridians, that have branches connected to bodily organs and functions. The native wisdom of Chinese medicine has been around for thousands of years in various forms like herbology, acupuncture, massage, exercise, and dietary therapies.

This ancient practice is still relevant in modern Western society. In fact, acupuncturists are expecting an increase in demand for services in the coming years due to the implementation of Obamacare. Many state-funded health plans and flexible spending accounts are now required to include acupuncture treatment as part of healthcare coverage under the Affordable Care Act (1).

cherry treeToday, Western society mostly uses Chinese medicine as a complementary, holistic, alternative medical practice. It can give patients an integrated view of their body, diet, lifestyle, and environment. Furthermore, this view can be as micro or macro as the practitioner desires. A Chinese medicine practitioner has advanced knowledge of the interrelation of the mind, body, and soul, and how these layers of being interact. They view symptoms as integrated information, rather than separate and coincidental occurrences. Therefore, Chinese medicine empowers its patients to take a proactive approach in bringing change and awareness into themselves.

In this way, Chinese medicine is a great tool for addressing day-to-day stresses and challenges of modern life. It integrates all aspects of a person’s life together in prescribing treatments, so patients feel a greater sense of balance and energy.

Citations:

  1. Olinick, Erin A. “The Future of Acupuncture.” March 28, 2014. <http://aimc.edu/2014/03/as-acupuncture-grows-under-the-affordable-care-act/> Accessed on April 24, 2015.

Photography credit:

All images were taken and are copyrighted by Charles Ryan Barber. For photography inquiries, please visit www.charlesryanbarber.com.

Medical Disclaimer: This article is for informational purposes only. Before starting any new medical treatment, please consult your doctor or health care practitioner. 

Missy Hoffman

Missy Hoffman

Missy is a multifaceted corporate gypsy, yoga teacher, green lifestyle blogger, and catalyst for positive change. She is passionate about spreading awareness of the benefits of holistic, green living and building connected, conscious communities. You can find her on the beach in Santa Monica doing acrobatic yoga, exploring the newest vegetarian restaurants in town, or playing her beloved drum set, which under no circumstance will she let you touch. For inspiration, try Missy.Hoffman@greenlifestyles.org or Instagram @missykaiyoga.

ShareSHARE THIS
Missy Hoffman

Author: Missy Hoffman

Missy is a multifaceted corporate gypsy, yoga teacher, green lifestyle blogger, and catalyst for positive change. She is passionate about spreading awareness of the benefits of holistic, green living and building connected, conscious communities. You can find her on the beach in Santa Monica doing acrobatic yoga, exploring the newest vegetarian restaurants in town, or playing her beloved drum set, which under no circumstance will she let you touch. For inspiration, try Missy.Hoffman@greenlifestyles.org or Instagram @missykaiyoga.

Share This Post On

Submit a Comment