Edgar Cayce’s Health Advice

edgar-cayceIt was not until a few years ago that I started thinking about my main health goals. I asked myself what changes I would like to see in my diet, my exercise, and my mind. My curiosity about holistic health recently led me to Edgar Cayce’s Holistic Health Program: The Amazing Mind/Body/Sprit Approach of America’s Most Famous Healer by Daniel Redwood.

I needed evidence to be convinced that Edgar  Cayce (1877-1945) who, according to this book, gave more than 8,000 health psychic readings, really deserved the title of “America’s most famous healer.” Nonetheless, I was very interested in the health advice mentioned in this book. Here’s my favorite Edgar Cayce health advice regarding diet, exercise, and mind/body/spirit connection.

Diet

Edgar Cayce advocated for a predominantly alkaline-forming diet. Cayce stated that a healthy diet should include approximately 80 percent alkaline-forming foods and 20 percent acid-forming foods. For alkaline-forming foods, he recommended natural fruits and vegetables in season and preferably grown locally. For acid-forming foods, he preferred whole grains to processed white flour products, meats and dairy products. Cayce included meat in his list of recommended foods; granted the animals raised in Cayce’s era were in many ways more natural than those today, but he did still warn against fried meat.

Moderation is another keyword of the Cayce diet. Compared to the people in Cayce’s era, I find myself facing more challenges in today’s United States when trying not to overeat. I think many food corporations equate success with ever-growing sales, rather than helping people stay healthy and keeping the earth sustainable. What I can do so far is keep a food journal and write down what I eat, when I eat, and how much I eat every day, but it demands diligence and persistence which are not my biggest strengths. In order to write less, I eat less—I am pitting indolence against indulgence. Luckily, my indolence often wins and I am able to avoid overeating.

Exercise

In this area, Edgar Cayce recommended mild cardiovascular exercises and slow stretching exercises ideally done in the open air. The cardiovascular exercises include walking, bicycling, and swimming, whereas the stretching exercises include the big bend (bending the upper half of the body to touch the toes), rotating the waist, and bending the neck. All the stretching exercises are combined with deep breathing. With those exercise suggestions, Cayce aimed to help people restore health, instead of becoming “America’s Next Top Model”. The key is moderation rather than perfection.

[I exercise regularly as Cayce recommended, whereas I haven’t been able to exercise for exercises’ sake.] I exercise for the proven health benefits of exercise. For example, I do Pilates because it helps me get rid of menstrual cramps and I lift weights to tone my muscles. I enjoy jogging the most after I’m finished–when the sweat streams down my face and my heartbeat slowly goes back to normal. One day I hope to exercise not merely out of the fear of what might happen to me if I stop exercising. Instead, I want to exercise simply because I  enjoy every minute of the process.

Mind/Body/Spirit Connection

public-parkEdgar Cayce stated, “Spirit is the life, mind is the builder, and the physical is the result.” Living from within is another way of saying that. A health freak could be an insecure person dying for external approval. A sports jock could fight for victory under the pressure of masculinity’s norms, such as anti-femininity, success, toughness, and aggression. I do not want to amaze the world at the expense of my health, so I side with Cayce when it comes to the mind/body/spirit connection.

Cayce suggested meditation and prayer based on love, compassion, serving others or other purposes. He said that we must learn to meditate, just as we once learned to walk. Meditation involves a physical and mental relaxation: a lying or sitting posture, breathing, and affirming one’s oneness with the divine or all life are the three elements of meditation. Edgar recommended specific, directed visualization for one reason only: physical healing for oneself. He also frequently recommended healing prayer for others in an  indirect fashion.

I am a beginner in meditation and prayer, but I can see how meditation and prayer are closely connected with serenity and creativity. Entering a no-fault zone to see every unfulfilled need and opening my mind’s eye to see every change I can make are both  fascinating games for the mind.

I enjoyed Edgar Cayce’s Holistic Health Program, and I certainly do not want to wait until I am sick to adopt his health advice.

Rensi

Rensi is a GLN blogger who writes book reviews and movie reviews about healthy and eco-friendly lifestyles. With a B.A. degree in English and an M.A. degree in Communication Studies, she loves working in a multicultural setting with people from various disciplines. She enjoys reading, jogging, and translating Chinese jokes and pop songs into English.

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Rensi

Author: Rensi

Rensi is a GLN blogger who writes book reviews and movie reviews about healthy and eco-friendly lifestyles. With a B.A. degree in English and an M.A. degree in Communication Studies, she loves working in a multicultural setting with people from various disciplines. She enjoys reading, jogging, and translating Chinese jokes and pop songs into English.

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