Water Memory — Part I: Science

water dropFrench Immunologist Jacques Benveniste (March 12, 1935 – October 3, 2004) published a controversial paper that appeared in the 1988 edition of the prestigious scientific journal Nature.  In his paper, Dr. Benveniste described experiments that identify molecular change in very high dilutions of anti-lgE antibody and that water had retention properties of molecules previously dissolved.  Dr. Benveniste concluded that the configuration of molecules is biologically active.  He later coined the phrase ‘Water Memory’.

Water memory is the ability of water to retain memory of substances previously dissolved even after an arbitrary number of serial dilutions.  The principal of Water Memory is the foundation for all homeopathic remedies, specifically remedies that mirror the disease, whereby a substance that causes a disease in healthy people will cure similar symptoms in sick people.

water sprayBenveniste made the assertion that ‘memory’ could be digitalized, transmitted, and then reinserted into another sample of water, which would then contain the same active qualities as the first water sample.  The ethical and scientific implications of such a discovery are profound; yet the scientific community thumbed its collective nose, mocking Benveniste and calling his experiments pure pseudo-science.  An extensive international investigation ensued as the journal Nature asked that Benveniste’s findings be investigated by independent laboratories.  No one was able to replicate his findings.  His reputation was ruined within the scientific community — until now.  In 2014 the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) convened a controversial international meeting hosted by a Nobel Laureate to once again reopen a debate of profound importance to our most fundamental understandings of biology, chemistry and physics: Does water truly have the capacity to carry information via an electromagnetic imprint from DNA and other molecules?  The debate, it seems, rages on and makes us mindful that all living things are important, especially water.

Sources:

http://news.sciencemag.org/people-events/2014/09/unesco-host-meeting-controversial-memory-water-research

David Sebek

David Sebek

David is a Senior Reporter and Blogger with the Green Lifestyles Network. He graduated from Ohio State University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Philosophy. He is a screenwriter and guitarist, having studied under classical guitarist Paul Hinrich while obtaining his degree in Philosophy. He moved to Los Angeles in 1998 and has been working on ideas for cinema.

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David Sebek

Author: David Sebek

David is a Senior Reporter and Blogger with the Green Lifestyles Network. He graduated from Ohio State University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Philosophy. He is a screenwriter and guitarist, having studied under classical guitarist Paul Hinrich while obtaining his degree in Philosophy. He moved to Los Angeles in 1998 and has been working on ideas for cinema.

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